Offense Success Rate at 60%, Defense Success Rate at 62%...Overall Dominant Longhorn Performance - NinosCorner Sports | Efficient Sports Analytics...Successful, Relevant Data

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Offense Success Rate at 60%, Defense Success Rate at 62%...Overall Dominant Longhorn Performance

Offense Success Rate at 60%, Defense Success Rate at 62%...Overall Dominant Longhorn Performance
by. BR Battle

Photo by: Eric Gay/Associate Press

The longhorns come away with a dominating win, the first in Coach Tom Herman’s Texas coaching career.  Although this win came against an inferior opponent in San Jose State, we all know the saying, “a win is a win.”  With Shane Buechelle sidelined with a shoulder injury, true freshman QB, Sam Ehlinger, received his first start as a member of the Texas football team.  Starting a true freshman, no matter what level of competition you face, will force any team to go back to basics, and for this Longhorn team that was shocked with a week 1 loss to Maryland, back to the basics is what they did.  

The Texas offense ran the ball nearly twice as much as they passed the ball, a necessary change from what we saw last week.  The result was an offense success rate of 60%.  Additionally, the Longhorns compiled 5 explosive plays of 15 yards or more, tallying an explosive rate of 9%.  The low number of explosive plays should not be alarming.  With Texas running the ball as much as they did, the opportunities for explosive plays decreases significantly.  The Longhorns sacrificed explosive plays for constant churning of 5 to 6 yards per play. 




The defense also had a pretty successful day.  They performed to a success rate of 62%, while only allowing 3 explosive plays, equating to a 6% explosive plays allowed rate.  



Although the defense did pitch a shutout, there were a few concerns that were shown in this game.  The Longhorn secondary has to get better from week-to-week.  San Jose State dropped a few passes that should have been caught or long, explosive plays and possible touchdowns.  However, these plays did not happen and the Longhorn defense was successful in shutting out the Aztecs.  Going forward in the season, Texas needs to figure out a way to apply pressure to the QB.  Applying pressure will allow the secondary a better opportunity to make plays.  No pressure on the QB equates to the defensive backs having to cover their opponents for a longer period of time.  The longer a defensive back is in coverage, the more opportunity the receiver has to get open. 




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